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Allard

The company produced approximately 1900 cars until its closure in 1964.
Filed under:  Companies
 
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Allard (Great Britain) 1936-l964, 2006-
UPDATE: The new Allard has negotiated the world-wide rights to the Allard signature and J2X design from the son of Sydney Allard (Allan).

Allard Motor Works now offers the hand-crafted Allard J2X MkII on a modern CAD-designed chassis, IFS, IRS, with 4 choices of engine - the GM RamJet 350 PFI, the 5.7 Hemi, the 6.1 Hemi and the Cadillac Northstar.

The serial numbers have been awarded to Allard by the Allard Registry, which registers their MkIIs and they limit production to only 100 vehicles per year, irrespective of demand. Allard will ship worldwide.

(source: Allard)


allard logo new

New, updated Allard logo.

The Allard Motor Company was an English car manufacturer founded in 1936 by Sydney Allard.

Allards generally featured a large American V8 engine in a small, light British sports car body, giving a high power to weight ratio and foreshadowing the more famous AC Cobra - in fact, Carroll Shelby drove an Allard in the 1950s, and it was doubtless an inspiration.

Winner of the Monte-Carlo Rally and the first-ever British Hillclimb Championship in cars bearing his own name, Sydney Allard became a legend in his own time. The first Allard special was completed in 1936 and was based on a 1934 TT Ford V8.

The Allards were powerful cars built for competition. A few production cars were built from 1937 basically two-seat Ford V8s, but from 1945 came the first true Allards, the K1, the L and the J1, still Ford-based but with long-nosed bodies designed by Godfrey Imhof. The J-type could also be specified with a 3917 cc Mercury V8. A drophead coup? version of the L, the M-type appeared in 1947. In 1949 came the immortal J2 Allard, with coil spring, independent front suspension, de Dion rear axle and a 4375 cc Mercury. With Ardun ohv con- version, the J2 could top 110 mph. Production of Allard cars ceased in the 60s with the Ford Zephyr-engined Palm Beach model.

Only 83 J2Xs were built. Most were exported. There is some debate as to what the X represented, as the car was an improvement on the J2. Some say that it was because the car was extended to move the engine forward to make more room in the cockpit; others say that it was because it was mainly an exported car. Only 7 were produced with right-hand drive- 3 staying in the UK and the rest finding homes in HongKong, Singapour and South Africa. Most were exported without engine (rolling chassis) and were later equipped by their new owners with the Chrysler FirePower Hemi or the Cadillac 331. Thirteen were the J2X-LM (LeMans). These were specially prepared J2Xs because of a change in FIA rules banning open-wheels on the race cars. This is where Zora Arkus Dontov (father of the Corvette) did the design (and raced) the closed-bodied J2X. They raced in the 24-Hours of Le Mans.


Prewar Allard Specials.
The first Allard cars were built specifically to compete in Trials events - timed events somewhat like rallies but through much worse terrain, almost impassable by wheeled vehicle. The first Allard mounted a Ford Flathead V8 in a body mostly sourced from a Bugatti racing car, and used the American engine's high torque to great effect in this slow-speed competition.

Further Allards were soon built, all specially ordered, and fitted with a variety of large, Ford-sourced engines, including Lincoln Zephyr V12 powerplants. By 1939 and the outbreak of war, twelve Allard Specials had been built, and Sydney Allard planned volume production, but the war forced a delay to those plans. Allard's company worked instead on Ford-based trucks during the war years, and when hostilities ceased, Allard had built up quite an inventory of Ford parts.

Postwar.
The first Allard cars were built specifically to compete in Trials events - timed events somewhat like rallies but through much worse terrain, almost impassable by wheeled vehicle. The first Allard mounted a Ford Flathead V8 in a body mostly sourced from a Bugatti racing car, and used the American engine's high torque to great effect in this slow-speed competition.

Further Allards were soon built, all specially ordered, and fitted with a variety of large, Ford-sourced engines, including Lincoln Zephyr V12 powerplants. By 1939 and the outbreak of war, twelve Allard Specials had been built, and Sydney Allard planned volume production, but the war forced a delay to those plans. Allard's company worked instead on Ford-based trucks during the war years, and when hostilities ceased, Allard had built up quite an inventory of Ford parts.

Postwar.
Using these and bodywork of Allard's own design, three postwar models were introduced: the J, a competition sports car; the K, a slightly larger car intended for road use, and the L, with four seats. All used primarily Ford mechanicals, making them easy to maintain anywhere. Sales were fairly brisk for a low-volume car, and demand was high for cars in general; Allard introduced several larger models, the M and N.

Sydney Allard soon saw the potential of the US market, in much better shape financially and rather lacking in quality sports cars. A special model intended for the American market was soon produced, the J2, fitted with a new independent rear suspension. They were available with a huge choice of different American engines, including a new Cadillac V8, much more powerful than the Ford units used before. Importing American engines just to ship them back across the Atlantic proved troublesome, so soon US-bound Allards were shipped engineless and fitted out in the States.

They proved phenomenally successful, and the American mechanicals meant that unlike more exotic British sportscars, they were familiar beasts for mechanics to work on. They were used to great effect in competition on both sides of the Atlantic, including a third place at Le Mans in 1950 and first place in the Monte Carlo Rally in 1952.

Decline.
Allard's R&D department, unfortunately, did not keep up its former pace, and soon other manufacturers were producing cheaper and more technically advanced cars. Allard scrambled to try and keep up, but its new Palm Beach smaller car was a year later than its competitors. Allard's new K-3 also did not live up to expectations, though it was a beautiful car, and their Safari Estate, a large Woody station wagon with eight seats, a huge V8 engine and beautiful bodywork, didn't seem to find a market.

By the mid fifties Allard was struggling as a manufacturer. Its attempt to give Dodge dealers a Corvette competitor using a rebodied Palm Beach with a Dodge Hemi engine were hit by the recession in the US economy in the late Fifties, and Allard produced few cars after 1959, and those only to special order.

Sixties Allards were performance modified British Fords, rather than wholly Allard bodywork, and everything ended in 1966 when Sydney Allard died; on the same night, a fire destroyed the factory and most Allard company records.


allard logo 1.gif

Allard logo.

allard logo 2.gif

Allard logo, Canada, 1981.

ALLARD BROCHURES
allard palm beach brochure cover 52 54

1952-1954 Allard Palm Beach cover. (source: ).

allard safari brochure cover 52 54

1952-1954 Allard Safari cover. (source: ).

allard k3 touring brochure cover 52 54

1952-1954 Allard K-3 Touring cover. (source: ).

allard monte carlo brochure cover 52 54

1952-1954 Allard Monte Carlo cover. (source: ).

allard brochure cover 49

1949 Allard brochure cover.

ALLARD ADS
allard ad 52

1952 Allard ad for the Palm Beach, 2,5 Litre, Monte Carlo, Safari and K.3.

ALLARD EMBLEMS
allard emblem 1

(submitted by ).


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